Joseph Goodall of Bradley

Joseph Goodall was Ari’s 6x great-grandfather, born in 1758 in Bradley, Ashbourne, Derbyshire and christened on 5 October at All Saints’ Church.

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His parents were William Goodall and Mary Pegg, who had married in Ashbourne earlier in 1758.

We know that Joseph was a farmer, from his daughter’s marriage certificate, but there are no other records to confirm this. In about 1801 he married Ann, and their first daughter Hannah was born in 1802, followed by Fanny in 1804, Elizabeth in 1808, Joseph in 1813 and Harriet in 1817.

Joseph died in 1827 and was buried in the churchyard at Bradley.

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Ari, this is how you are related to Joseph:

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Mary Anne Tilley

One of Ari’s ancestors (a 4x great-grandmother) was Mary Anne Tilley. Her christening record at St James in Poole helpfully gives her date of birth: 9 February 1812 (in the Dorset, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538–1812 collection on Ancestry.co.uk).

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The magnificent Georgian interior of St James comes as something of a surprise to visitors who know little of its history. Its building in 1819–21 resulted from the old parish church having deteriorated beyond repair, and the hazard to public health of the quantity of human remains in the vault beneath. Some of the old memorial tablets from the old building were transferred to the new church.
An unusual feature of the interior are the pine columns in groups of four that support the vaulted roof. They were brought over from Newfoundland, probably on the decks of Poole ships engaged in the Newfoundland trade.

Her parents were Henry and Hannah Tilley. After the christening, the first record we have of Mary Anne is her marriage on 16 December 1834 to Joseph Allen. The marriage took place at Kinson, which was a chapelry in the parish of Canford Magna and is now a suburb of Bournemouth. Mary Anne’s brother Samuel Tilley was a witness to the marriage, as was Elizabeth Allen, possibly a sister of Joseph’s.

In the 1841 census they are living in Christchurch Rd, Parkstone, with their children Sarah Ann (5), Alfred Augustus (3), and 9-month-old Walter Sydna. By 1851, four more children have been born: Joseph Samuel (7), Justin Edward (5), Emily Leodine (3), and Elizabeth Mary (10 months). An aunt of Joseph’s, Elizabeth Redway (75), is also living with the family.

By 1861 their youngest child Edwin Frederick has been born, Sarah Ann has married and had a child of her own, and Alfred has also married and left home. In the 1871 census Mary Anne is staying with Sarah Ann and her family in Christchurch, and she is also listed there as a visitor in the 1881 census, after the death of her husband Joseph in 1876.

Mary Anne died in 1886 and was buried on 4 February, probably in St James’ churchyard, Poole.

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Re-erected gravestones in old burial ground, alongside West Street. The burial ground replaced an earlier one in St James’ churchyard, which was prone to flooding, with the risk of corpses being resurrected.

Ari, this is how you are related to Mary Anne:

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Wilful murder in Heage

So I’m happily going through the death certificates recently ordered from the GRO, and filling in the causes of death in my database, when I come to the certificate I’ve received for William Taylor, Ari’s 6x great-grandfather:

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Not what one expects to find! This happened on 31 July 1849 in Heage, Derbyshire.

I then found the newspaper accounts in the British Newspaper Archive on Findmypast. The story appeared in the Derbyshire Courier and the Buxton Herald on 4 August 1849.

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William was born in 1784 in Staveley, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, to Thomas and Sarah Taylor. His christening took place on 19 September 1784 at the church of St John the Baptist. In 1808 he married Millicent Bower, and they had at least six children.

William worked as a collier, and afterwards as a nailmaker (one report says that he kept a shop in Belper). The murder was reported quite widely, even outside the county (this is the London Morning Post):

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The accused was charged at the next assizes, the following spring:

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The Staffordshire Advertiser reported the outcome on 30 March 1850:

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Such a sad story! The full newspaper accounts give lots of details about William and other family members, so I need to read them thoroughly. The moral of the story: death certificates are definitely worth finding!

Ari, this is how you are related to William:

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Meyer Loshak from Hritsiv, Ukraine

Ari’s 3x great-grandfather Meyer Loshak was born on 4 April 1884 in a town that is now called Hritsiv in Ukraine.

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Before WWI the town was called Gritsev, and it was in the Volhynia district of the Russian Empire. In 1879, the year of the Russian census, the Jewish population of the town was 979. There was a pogrom there on 21 Sept 1917. The town was captured by the Germans on 5 July 1941, and a ghetto was established. All the Jewish people of the town (c.1900 at that time)  were murdered either in 1941 or in 1942 after being transferred to another ghetto.

Meyer was the son of Lazarus (Eleazer) Loshak and Dvossie Singer. He came to England in 1906, following the 1905 Russian Revolution. His son Harry has given us the story:

“He was the youngest but one of a large family. He soon displayed a formidable aptitude at the casuistic arguments about the significance of the sacred texts. The result was that he was regarded by his teachers and his father as destined to become a rabbi. He had a remarkable gift for languages. Yiddish was his mother tongue. He quickly acquired the Hebrew and Aramaic needed for the Talmud. Before the age of 13 he had also learnt to read and speak Russian as well as the Ukrainian dialect. When he came to Britain in 1906 he soon became fluent in English, which he spoke without trace of a foreign accent. Having learnt Russian he read widely in Russian literature, both the classic authors and contemporary left-wing literature. It was the latter which, when he was about 14, led him to lose religious faith and to become an atheist, much to his father’s disgust. At 15, he left home and supported himself by teaching Russian to Yiddish-speaking Jews. He joined the Bund, a left-wing Jewish political group which was then allied to the Communist movement. As such, he took an active part in the unsuccessful 1905 revolution. Exactly what his role was, I do not know, but it led to a warrant for his arrest by the Tsarist police. He went into hiding and was later smuggled across the border into Germany to avoid probable deportation to Siberia. After spending a few weeks in Germany, he came to Britain on a ship from Hamburg to London.”

This passport  was issued by the “Headman of Middle Class citizens of Settlement Grizev. The bearer of this document, the Middle Class citizen Meer Leizorovich Loshak, from Volynsky province, Zaslavski region, settlement Grizev, is discharged to various cities and settlements of the Russian Empire till 22 April 1904. Issued 22 April 1903.”

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In London, “he took a room in a lodging house and, for a month or two, made a meagre living by selling neckties from a barrow in Petticoat Lane. A fellow lodger, named Pertschuk, who worked for a fur skin merchant in the City, told him of a vacancy at this merchant’s. My father applied for it and was appointed. He remained for a few years, when he left the job and set up in business as a fur skin merchant on his own account.”

This is a photo from 1906.

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Meyer married Freida (Fannie) Nisman on 4 July 1907 in the Register Office in Whitechapel (I had never noticed before, but you can see that Joseph Pertschuk was a witness to the marriage).

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We have many letters that Meyer wrote to his son and other family members, and the National Archives at Kew holds some of his business records. There are also many passenger records showing him travelling to New York on business. He became a British citizen in 1911.

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Meyer and Fannie had four sons. This picture shows the family in 1928:

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A claim to fame from the Jewish Chronicle, 14 Nov 1947:

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Meyer died on 22 May 1937 at 26 Exeter Rd, Kilburn, at the age of 53 (the causes were syncope, coronary occlusion, coronary thrombosis), and was buried at Willesden Cemetery.

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In his will he left many interesting bequests, including to his sister Leah Singer of Poland and her daughter Sosia Gejfman (I believe that they died in the Holocaust). He also mentions other siblings I did not know: “WHEREAS I have been allowing various sums of money monthly to each of my brothers O. Loshak of Tulchin Russia, [and] my sister Chissie Tachtenberg of Odessa Russia … it is my earnest wish that my wife should continue to make them allowances of at least Four pounds a month each.”

I would love to find any descendants of these relations, and more information about them.

An obituary of Meyer was published in the Fur News.

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Ari, this is how you are related to Meyer:

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Moses Gurvich of Svencionys

One of Ari’s Lithuanian ancestors was Moses Gurvich, the father of LK Hurwitz. Moses was known as Movsha or Moshe, and his middle name was Nison. He was Ari’s 4x great-grandfather.

Moses was born in about 1847 in Svencionys, Lithuania and died aged 73 in 1920, also in Lithuania. He worked as a timber merchant.

The middle name proved to be the clue that enabled me to discover relatives in Wisconsin a couple of years ago (before that I had no idea about his parents or brothers and sisters).

This was discovered from the birth record of LK’s son Khatzkel (Charles) in the  Lithuania Database on the JewishGen website:

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The second column gives the names of his father, grandfather (top row) and mother, grandfather (second row).

Other records show him aged 11 with his family in the 1858 Revision List in Svencionys.

He must have married in about 1868, and five children were born between 1870 and 1881. They were Leah, Gittel (Gertrude), LK, Sorel (Sara), and Chasel (Charlotte).

A small diversion

Leah married Moshe Michelson and owned a flour mill. She was killed in 1943 in Lithuania with three of their children (a grandson, Khaim Mikhelson, has submitted testimony to Yad Vashem). One of her sons, Jacob (Yankel) married Jehudith Kuritsky. She has written an account of what happened to the family in Svencionys when the Germans arrived in 1941. This is just the first page.

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Back to the story

From the records giving me his father’s name, I was able to match someone in America who had been contacting me wondering whether our Hurwitz familes were related. At that time I had no way of telling. She turned out to be descended from Moses’s brother Vulf, who emigrated to the US in 1921, providing us with many new relations in Milwaukee.

Here is the record of Moses’ second marriage at the age of 64 on 30 July 1909 (I knew that after his first wife Annie had died he had married her sister). What I don’t know from this is whether Tzimerman is their maiden name or whether she was a widow.

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As far as I can see, all of his grandchildren were born before he died in 1920, so nobody in that generation is named after him.

Ari, this shows how you are related to Moses:

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William Sheppard of Worcestershire

Today we found the grave of William Sheppard, Ari’s 4x great-grandfather, and his wife Angelina. They are both buried at the church of St John the Baptist in Crowle, Worcestershire.

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William was born in 1843 at Sale Green in Worcestershire, and christened on 24 Feb. at Huddington church.

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Parish chest in Huddington church

William’s father Joseph died when he was just five years old. In the census for 1851 he is living with his mother Mary, a ‘pauper gloveress’, and older brother Joseph.

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By 1861 Mary has become a shopkeeper, and 18-year-old William is working as an agricultural labourer. He married Angelina Tyler in 1863 and by the 1871 census they have five children: Esther, William Henry, Joseph, Fanny, and one-month-old Elizabeth. William is still an agricultural labourer.

All the children were christened at the church in Crowle.

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By 1881 two more children have been born: James in 1872 and Mary in 1876. The family are living in Sale Green, next door to Angelina’s parents John and Sarah Tyler.

In 1885 William was fined 2s. 6d. for neglecting to send his children to school:

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Worcestershire Chronicle, from Findmypast

A slight change for William by 1891. He has become a groom and coachman, and all the children have now left home.

The last census for William is in 1901. He is living in Worcester Rd, Droitwich, and working as a domestic coachman.

He died on 9 Dec 1902 and was buried on the 13th.

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Ari, this shows how you are related to William:

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