Troth Shore from Darley Dale

Troth Shore was Ari’s 8x great-grandmother. She was born in Darley Dale, Derbyshire, in 1725 and baptised on 5 March. Pigot’s Directory from 1835 tells us that:

DARLEY DALE is a hamlet, in the parish of Darley, which is partly in the hundred of Wirksworth, but chiefly in the hundred of High Peak, lying on the road between Matlock Bath and Bakewell, about five miles from either place. The situation of this hamlet is one of great beauty, being seated in a lovely valley, upon the banks of the Derwent.” (See http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/DBY/DarleyDale)

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Her father was Roger Shore, but her mother isn’t mentioned in the baptism record. At the age of twenty-three she married John Kitchen. I have just discovered that he was from Bonsall (and also his age, which was twenty-seven). This is recorded on the marriage licence document, included in Findmypast’s collection of the Dioceses Of Lichfield & Coventry Marriage Allegations And Bonds, 1636-1893:

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I have found records for five or six children: John (probably born in 1749, died in 1752); Robert (born and died in 1751); Elizabeth (born in 1755); Roger (born in 1757); Sarah (born in 1759); and Betty (died in 1764 – I think this could be Elizabeth):

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It seems as though they were living in Bonsall, as all the children were baptised there.

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I have just found a burial date for her: 22 Feb 1794, in Bonsall.

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Ari, this is how you are related to Troth:

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Joseph Waters of Pershore

Joseph is one of the fifty of Ari’s 5x great-grandfathers whose names we know. He was born in 1802 in Pershore, Worcestershire, the oldest son of William Waters and Sarah Andrews. His baptism took place at the church of the Holy Cross and St Edburga on 25 July. The church is a former abbey, built in the eleventh century.

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In about 1830, he married Mary, but no record has been found for this, so we don’t know her surname. In the 1841 census, Mary isn’t there, but Joseph is with his parents and his and Mary’s two sons, William and Thomas.

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1841 census for Holy Cross Parish, from Ancestry.co.uk

I found a burial for Mary Waters, aged 27, on 6 October 1835 at the same church in Pershore.

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A monument in the church

In 1851, Joseph is living as a lodger with Thomas and Mary Harris, and working as an agricultural labourer. His oldest son William had married by then and Thomas was working as a farm labourer and living on the farm in the parish of St Martin, Worcester.

In 1861, Joseph is living next door to his now-married son Thomas in Pershore High Street, and his brother George is living with him (all three men are agricultural labourers).

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Coat of arms on a gate post in Pershore

Joseph died on 4 March 1865.

Ari, this is how you are related to Joseph:

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William Thomas Butt

Another of Ari’s 5x great-grandfathers was William Thomas Butt, son of Asher Butt and Elizabeth Thomas.

William was born on 5 August 1815 in Christchurch, Dorset.

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Christchurch castle

I can’t find William in the 1841 census, but he wasn’t living with either of his parents. In 1844 he married Fanny Briant. He gave his profession as ‘valet’.

In the 1851 census, after Fanny’s death, he can be seen living at an unnamed hotel in Castle Street, Christchurch, and working as an ostler. (At the time of her death in 1847, he was described as an innkeeper.)

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The Kings Arms Hotel in Castle Street

It doesn’t look as though he remarried. In 1861, he was working as a stableman and living at Holdenhurst, just north of Christchurch.

He died the following year, aged just 45 (the cause was consumption). An announcement appeared in the Christchurch Times on 19 April 1862, presumably placed by his daughter Elizabeth:

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Millhams Street is just next to Ducking Stool Lane in Christchurch, where this 1986 replica can be seen:

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Ari, this is how you are related to William:

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Abram Schlaume Feinstein

Abram was Ari’s 5x great-grandfather, born in 1808 in Palanga, on the Baltic Sea, in north-west Lithuania. At the time, Palanga was in Courland, and part of the Russian Empire. A description by Yudel Mark can be found in a yizkor [memorial] book about Lithuania:

“The name comes from the Lithuanian po langa, meaning “up to the windows,” that is, the sea reached as far as the windows.” People came to Palanga in the summer to bathe, and it was not a particularly pious place because the men were working with amber, rather than studying religious texts.

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“Amber established the entire way of life in the shtetl. … People lived according to the clock. All of Palanga awakened at the same hour and ate the main meal at the same time. The midday meal was exactly at 12 noon. There was an “afternoon snack” exactly at 4. The time of work, eating and rest was not haphazard, as was characteristic of a shtetl where trade was the main source of income. And as long as the amber workers lived well, the storekeepers who had a “stall” (a shop), the butcher, the baker, the wagon driver and so forth, earned, too. The one-story wooden houses in which we lived were very spacious with good floors of painted boards. The houses often had a small garden near them. Jews also had large gardens with vegetables and there were several who had potato fields. A few rich Jews had large orchards with assorted fruits. I remember the surprise of the Jews who came from Drobian (Darbenai): “The Palanga Jews eat meat every day!” In truth, however, we also ate much fish, particularly during the summer months. Mencas [fish found in Latvia], flekshnes (flounders) and small herring dried on long strings on every Palanga farm.”

I recommend the full account, which can be read here.

I have no information about Abram apart from this: From the military records of 1845, we know that he was born in 1808, and that he was the father of Isaac Abram and the son of Schlaume Levin Feinstein. We also know that he had an older brother called Hirsch and a younger brother, Schmuel. I’m not sure if this Hirsch is the same one who was arrested on the evening of 30 August 1832, with twelve other men from Palanga. The thirteen Jews had hatched a plot against a meat tax and were sentenced to fourteen days in prison. They also had to pay 40 Roubles in silver coins to cover the arrears. The meat or slaughter tax was paid for each animal that was slaughtered. See the full story, with the original documents, on this page.

Elizabeth Chaddock of Denby

Elizabeth was Ari’s 7x great-grandmother, born at Denby in Derbyshire in 1751. Her parents were John and Elizabeth, and I have found no siblings for her so far.

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The first record we have for her is her christening on 3 November 1751, and the second is her marriage on 8 May 1772 to Isaac Millington, a collier.

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Derbyshire, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1932
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Detail of the nave roof, 15th century, restored 1901

Elizabeth and Isaac had nine children between 1773 and 1786. They were Isaac, Anne, Ellen, Grace, John, Patrick, Sarah, Jacob and Elizabeth (who went on to marry Thomas Parker and so become Ari’s 6x great-grandmother).

On 31 March 1812, Elizabeth died. She was buried on the 3rd of April, and shares a gravestone with her husband in the churchyard in Denby.

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Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812

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Ari, this is how you are related to Elizabeth:

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Fred Albert Dibben of Witchampton, Dorset

One of Ari’s 4x great-grandfathers was Fred Albert Dibben, born in 1848 in Witchampton, Dorset.

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He was the fourth son of Isaac Dibben and Elizabeth Frampton, and was baptised on 3 September 1848 at the church dedicated to St Mary, St Cuthburga & All Saints. The online parish clerk’s page gives a good description of Witchampton: “With its quaint timber-framed and thatched cottages resplendent in summer with honeysuckle, roses and jasmine, the village of Witchampton has been described as one of the most beautiful in the country.”

The 1851 census shows Fred, age 2, with his family in the village. His father Isaac was a miller. Fred was still at school in 1861, while his older brother John was working as a blacksmith. Before the next census, Fred had married Emma Orchard, daughter of William Orchard of Langton Matravers. The marriage took place on 19 May 1870, at the parish church of Corfe Castle.

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View from the church, August 2017

Fred gave his occupation as a gardener. In the census of 1871, Fred and Emma are living with Isaac, recently widowed, at Lower Street in Witchampton.

Their daughter Alice Sarah was born later that year, followed by Annie Elizabeth, Lucy Mary, Blanche Edna, and then a son, James Albert, in 1886. By this time Fred was working as a general dealer, and they had moved to West Parley.

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An unusual monument in the eastern wall of the church at West Parley. Behind the grille and glass is an urn which apparently contains the heart of the Lady of Lydlinch, who endowed the church in the fourteenth century

 

Emma died in 1897, and Fred was working as a market gardener at the time of the census in 1901. Lucy, Blanche and James were still at home.

Fred died in December 1908 and was buried at Hampreston.

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Witchampton: Sheephouse Drove signpost

Ari, this is how you are related to Fred:

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