Caroline Dawson of Derby (and the Hot Dog King)

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Caroline Dawson was Ari’s 4x great-grandmother, the mother of Annie Morris (whose story is told in this post). Yesterday we visited Dale Road in Derby, where she lived, and found this Sikh gurdwara.

The house is still there, but is now a little shop, Oceans Travel:

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Caroline was born in 1844 in Duffield, Derbyshire. In 1851 she can be seen in the census, aged six, living at Upper Green. Her father, Henry Dawson, was a silk glove maker and framework knitter, and her older brother William was a silk winder. Her grandparents (Henry’s parents, Francis and Martha) were also living with them at the time of the census.

The local newspapers at this time were full of articles discussing the depressed state of the hosiery industry. This is from the Derby Mercury on 24 September 1851:

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By the time that she was sixteen, Caroline was working as a silk glove seamer. In 1864 Caroline’s father died, and on 28 December 1868 she married William Morris, a foundry labourer, at the Register Office in Derby. The 1871 census shows Caroline living with William in the house of his parents, no. 69 Russell Street, Litchurch.

This is the street where Harry M. Stevens, inventor of the hot dog, once lived. He also worked at a local foundry before emigrating to the US. Other ideas of his included improved baseball scorecards for spectators, and selling soda with a straw so you could drink without missing the game.

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Derby Daily Telegraph 12 October 1940

Litchurch is described on Wikipedia as “originally an obscure locality on the edge of Derby” but “rapid urbanisation and population growth in the 19th century led to it briefly existing as a separately governed local authority between 1860 and 1888, prior to once again being absorbed by its neighbour”.

By 1881 Caroline and William were living at 6 Harrington Street in Derby (the house isn’t there any more). Caroline had now had a son, John Henry, who was born in 1869 but sadly died at the age of twelve, and three daughters: Elizabeth Ann (Lizzie) in 1873; Charlotte Ellen (Nellie) in 1875 and Annie in 1880.

In 1891 they are at the same address. Elizabeth and Charlotte are both working (as assistant dressmaker and assistant milliner), and Caroline’s fifteen-year-old nephew, William Frank Dawson, is living with them too.

By 1901 they have moved to 38 Nelson Road, Normanton. Caroline is now fifty-six. No occupation is given for her. William is now working as a gas fitter, and daughters Charlotte and Annie are both milliners.

The 1911 census shows Caroline at 100 Dale Road, Derby, listed as “House Wife”. She died on 21 December 1914.

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Derby Daily Telegraph 21 December 1915

I have not found out where she is buried, and she did not leave a will.

Ari, this is how you are related to Caroline:

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William Castledine of Wilne

William Castledine of Wilne, Derbyshire, was Ari’s 8x great-grandfather. He was born on 30 September 1712 and baptised on 1 October at the church of St Chad, along with his twin brother Samuel.

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Bench mark, St Chad’s church, Wilne, used to record the height above sea level

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He married Elenor Freeman on 28 Mar 1748 (both described as ‘of Draycott’), and a son, Joseph, was baptised in January 1749 and buried on 9 December that year.

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The mill in Draycott, built in 1888.

Elenor died in January 1749, and William married Martha Earthley on 7 June 1750 at the same church. A daughter, Ann, was born in 1750 but died as a baby. Thomas was born in 1752, and then there was a gap before twins John and Philip in 1761. Another son, Edward, died in March 1765.

In 1763 the church got a coat of paint, recorded in the parish records:

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William died in January 1772 and was buried on 13 January.

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Ari, this is how you are related to William:

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Samuel Williams of Ashbourne, pig dealer and publican

One of Ari’s 5x great-grandfathers was Samuel Williams, born on 21 May 1810 in Ashbourne, Derbyshire.

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Samuel was the son of William and Frances Williams. He was baptised on 27 December 1810 at St Oswald’s church.

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Helpfully, the baptism record gives his exact birth date.

No records of Samuel have been found until his marriage, which took place on 20 April 1840 at the same church. His bride was Eliza Grace Potter. The marriage bond is in the collection of “Staffordshire, Dioceses Of Lichfield & Coventry Marriage Allegations and Bonds, 1636-1893” on Findmypast, and shows that Samuel was a pig dealer.

In the 1841 census the couple are living in Ashbourne with Emily’s parents, George and Ann Potter.

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Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal 04 December 1846

In 1849, Samuel appears in the Derbyshire Post Office Directory:

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In 1851 they are still living at Pig Market, with children Anne Eliza, Samuel, Emily Fanny,  and William George.

On 17 Feb 1854, this notice appeared in the Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal:

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In 1861 Samuel and Eliza are living in the same place, now with four more children: Louisa Maria, John, Frederick and Lucy. By 1870 Samuel is also working as a publican, at the Royal Oak. A lodger, also a pig dealer, is living with the family in 1871.

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Derby Mercury 29 May 1850

Samuel died in 1878 and was buried on the 1st of May at St Oswald’s. His abode at that time was given as Crown Yard.

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The Crown Inn was built in the mid 18th century and was a major coaching inn in the town. It closed some time around 1910. The arch gives access to Crown Yard at the rear and would originally have been used by stage coaches.

Ari, this is how you are related to Samuel:

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Mary Ann Brewell

Mary Ann Brewell was Ari’s 4x great-grandmother. She was born on 21 May 1846 in Wirksworth, Derbyshire, the third daughter of Ann Land and Joseph Brewell. Her father registered the birth and was unable to sign his name. His occupation was recorded as chimney sweeper. Mary Ann’s baptism took place on 14 June.

In the 1851 census Mary Ann is listed as a scholar, age 4, and ten years later she is still at school. The family live in the Dale, Wirksworth.

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At 18, Mary Ann married Henry Pearson, a labourer. Both gave their residence as Cromford. The wedding took place at St Mary’s church in Wirksworth. Mary Ann was unable to sign her name.

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St Mary’s. Norman carved fragments built into the north wall of the interior of the north transept

Their first child, Robert, was born in 1865 and baptised on 20 August. A daughter, Elizabeth, was born in 1867. Between these two births it seems that the family had moved to Scarthin Nick in Cromford, and this is where they were living in 1871. No occupation was given for Mary Ann in any of the censuses.

By 1891 they had moved to Bolton in Lancashire, where Henry was working in a cotton mill. Mary Ann was now 45. Robert and Elizabeth were living with them, and Robert was working as a carter to a coal merchant. Ernest Pearson, a ‘nurse child’ aged 2, born in Bolton, was also living with them. Was he related or had he just been adopted and taken their name?

In 1901 they were back in Derbyshire. They were living at 3 Bowling Green Lane, in Wirksworth. Both children had married by this time.

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Bowling Green Lane is a narrow ‘jitty’ or ‘ginnel’.

By the 1911 census they had moved to the almshouses in Wirksworth. Mary Ann was now 65, and they had been married for 46 years. They had nine grandchildren. Henry died a few months later, and Mary Ann lived until 20 August 1923, when she died at 23 Dale Street, of atrophic degeneration of the heart. She was 78. Her son Robert was present at her death. No will, burial, or death announcement has been found yet.

Ari, this is how you are related to Mary Ann:

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Another sad story: Joseph Phipps

Joseph Phipps was Ari’s 4x great-grandfather. This is the only photo we have of him.

Joseph Phipps

He was born on 25 October 1848 in Holbrook, Belper, Derbyshire, the son of William Phipps and Mary Taylor. He was baptised on 6 October 1850.

In the census of 1851 we can see him aged 3 with his parents:

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By 1861 he is working as a cotton mill hand, with his older brother John and younger brother Francis.

On 30 December 1867 he married Ellen Boothby at St Alkmund’s church in Duffield, and by then his occupation was collier. The 1871 census shows him as a coal miner, and the couple have two children, William and Joseph. They are still living in Holbrook.

By 1881 he appears on the census as a labourer, and three daughters have been born: Mary Ann, Elizabeth and Emma.

In 1891 he is a quarry labourer, and they are living in Holbrook St.

In 1901 he has a new occupation, that of newsagent, and in 1911 the description “Nottingham Guardian” is added. He is now 63. Two sons, Joseph and John, are living with him and his wife, and the census shows that they have had eleven children altogether, with five having died before 1911.

Now we come to the sad part of the story, discovered through newspaper accounts. Joseph appeared in the newspapers a few times during his life.

This was in 1885:

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Derby Daily Telegraph, 30 Jan 1885

This episode was from 1896:

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Derby Daily Telegraph, 5 Nov 1896

On 23 July 1915, the Belper News reported:

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An inquest was held the following day.

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Let’s do a happy story next! Ari, this is how you are related to Joseph:

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Judith

Ari has two 11x great-grandmothers whose names I know. One of them was called Judith, and she was born in about 1640, somewhere near Duffield, Derbyshire. (Charles I was on the throne.)

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She married William Eyre in about 1660, and they had at least eight children: William, Samuel, George, Mary, Jonathan, Elizabeth, Sarah and Ann.

Judith died in December 1717 and was buried on the 29th of that month at St Alkmund’s in Duffield.

St Alkmund

 

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This record describes her as “of Windley”, which is a small village just west of Duffield and Belper.

The record of her burial comes from a collection called “Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812” on Ancestry.co.uk, filmed by the Latter-Day Saints.

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First page of the register

The most useful record we have of Judith’s life is her will, which is on Findmypast, in the collection “Staffordshire, Dioceses of Lichfield and Coventry wills and probate 1521-1860”.

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This is easy to read and gives us an amazing amount of detail. She says she lives in Postern, which is a hamlet in the parish of Duffield.

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Cast iron post by the B5023, in parish of SHOTTLE AND POSTERN (AMBER VALLEY District), Wirksworth Road; SE of Cowers Lane jct, 500m SW of jct with Calladine Lane, on grass verge in front hedge, on West side of road. Harrison iron casting Erected by the Ideridgehay & Duffield turnpike trust in the 19th century.
Inscription reads:- WIRKSW.H / 5 / MILES / : : DERBY / 8 / MILES / : Shottle / LONDON / 134 / MILES / : . ; J. Harrison / DERBY.
Listed.

In the will she lists her children:

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This gives us the married names of her daughters, and also tells us that she has a granddaughter Judith, daughter of her son Jonathan. (She gets five shillings.) The will was proved in Derby on 28 March 1718.

And then, best of all, we have a beautiful inventory.

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This gives us a really detailed picture. We can imagine her house, with a parlour, lower parlour, milkhouse and barn, and space for horses, cows, sheep and pigs. We also now know that she lived at “Postern Park”. This was part of Duffield Frith, which was a Royal Forest.

One day I will find out Judith’s full name!

Ari, this is how you are related to Judith:Screen Shot 2018-01-14 at 10.20.48

 

Thomas Castledine of Dale Abbey

Thomas Castledine was Ari’s 7x great-grandfather and I don’t know much about him yet. On 30 January 1787 he married Alice Warren at Dale Abbey in Derbyshire.

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“A more peaceful and pleasant spot than Dale Abbey is hard to find in the whole of Derbyshire. Yet it is less than three miles from the suburbs of Derby to the west, and even closer to a vast area of housing and industrialisation on the eastern side.

The story of Dale Abbey, or Depedale as it was originally known, begins when a Derby baker had a dream — the Virgin Mary appeared and told him to go to Depedale, to live a life of solitude and prayer. At that time it was a wild and marshy place and the hermit carved out a home and chapel in a sandstone cliff.

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Here he continued to worship in solitude until one day the smoke from his fire was seen by a Knight, Ralph Fitz Geremund the owner of the land. Intending to drive the intruder away, he rode over, but on hearing the hermit’s story he was filled with compassion, allowing him to remain and bestowing on him the tithe money from Borrowash Mill. This enabled the hermit to build a small chapel and home on the site of the present church.

After the hermit’s death, word spread of the religious significance of the place and following several attempts, Dale Abbey was founded in about 1200 by an order known as the White Canons because of the colour of their habits. The abbey remained until 1538, when it was dissolved and the greater part demolished by the command of Henry VIII.” (http://www.derbyshire-peakdistrict.co.uk/daleabbey.htm)

From the date of the marriage we can estimate that Thomas was born in about 1765. Thomas and Alice had at least six children: John, Thomas, Alice (Ari’s 6x great-grandmother), William (who died as a baby), Mary and Sarah (who died aged nine).

The children were baptised in Wilne, which is on the border with Leicestershire, and they were living in Draycott in 1813 when Sarah died.

No deaths or burials have been confirmed for Thomas yet, and he probably died before the 1841 census. I have not found a will or any definite newspaper records for him. There is a possible baptism in 1752 to a William and Martha. Also, a Thomas Castledine from Draycott signed up on 17 Jan 1807 to the 1st Foot Guards (this was the time of the Napoleonic Wars). Again, it will be a case of following up his children and any siblings to discover more about him.

Ari, this is how you are related to Thomas:

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Update: Thomas was born in 1752 and died on 3 April 1827.

Joshua Eyre of Hazelwood

One of Ari’s 9x great-grandfathers was Joshua Eyre, born in 1706 in Hazelwood, Derbyshire. He was baptised at the church in Duffield on 25 March 1706, the fifth son of Samuel Eyre and Hannah Tomlinson.

 

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On 11 June 1730, Joshua married Elizabeth Alsop, and the couple had seven children between 1731 and 1743.

I think they actually lived in Hazelwood, which is a village just north of Duffield. Their marriage record says ‘of Hazelwood’, and this is also recorded on the baptism of one of their sons, and in Joshua’s will. The church in Hazelwood was not built until 1846, so they would have had to walk to Duffield to use the church of St Alkmund.  Joshua’s father Samuel had left him three pieces of land in the liberty of Hazelwood: Calfe Close, Cawver Close and Bradley Close.

Joshua’s wife Elizabeth died some time before 1747, when he married again at the age of forty. His second wife was Ann Frost, described as ‘of Ashbourn, spinster, aged thirty’. Joshua is described in the marriage licence as a husbandman (tenant farmer or small landowner).

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They would go on to have seven children.

Joshua died in 1783, and his will is available to read on Findmypast.

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In the will, he lists all of the children of his ‘late son Joshua’ (who predeceased him by three years). He asks that his wife Ann ‘shall keep possession of the said closes or parcels of land for one year after my decease’. He helpfully gives us the names of his married daughters. Although he had signed his marriage licence, here he just puts his mark.

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The will was proved on 12 February 1783 at the Court in Lichfield.

Ari, this is how you are related to Joshua:

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Seventeenth-century ancestors

Recent research has allowed me to find a few ancestors of Ari’s who lived in England in the seventeenth century, some in Dorset and some in Derbyshire.

I thought it might be interesting to look at the historical context, focusing on one of these ancestors, William Tomlinson. William is Ari’s 11x great-grandfather (one of two that I have found so far).

He died on 3 March 1693 in Duffield, Derbyshire, and must have been married in about 1660 (based on the baptism dates of his children), which puts his birth date at about 1640.

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Charles I was on the throne at this time, and the English Civil War was just about to unfold. A PhD by Heather Falvey examines Duffield as part of a study of “custom, resistance and politics” in early modern England, and her thesis is available online. The parish of Duffield was part of the duchy of Lancaster, administered by a steward on behalf of the Crown. As well as farming and weaving, men at this time made their living by extracting iron ore, smelting, quarrying stone, mining coal, making charcoal, and making wire. (The occupation of wire-drawing involved turning metal into wire by drawing it through different-sized holes in a template.) Later, nail-making became more important in the area. Sources for this information in Heather’s PhD include the wills and inventories of some of these men. She also mentions a militia list from 1638 held in the National Archives, and of course men paid taxes, so there are hearth tax lists to consult. Heather uses the inventories of Duffield inhabitants to work out how many rooms they had and how wealthy they were, and we can do the same for Ari’s ancestors.

The inhabitants of Duffield had certain rights, and were entitled to use the forests, for example to feed their sheep and cattle, or to provide firewood and wood for making fences. This is what led to riots and resistance when some of the land was enclosed under Charles I. After a period of sabotage and non-compliance, actual rioting broke out in 1642. Evidence for these riots comes from court papers held in the National Archives, with 217 local people being named. They started by pulling down fences and destroying hedges “in a violent & tumultuous way”, and then drove their own cattle onto the king’s land.

This is the world that Ari’s ancestor William Tomlinson was born into, and it might even be possible to discover if his parents were involved. When William died in 1693 his estate was appraised and administered, and the records are part of the Findmypast collection called Staffordshire, Dioceses Of Lichfield and Coventry Wills and Probate 1521–1860. The first page starts in Latin, but then uses English to tell us that William’s surviving wife is called Anne. This page is signed by Anne, Samuel Tomlinson (William’s son), and Samuel Eyre, husband of William’s daughter Hannah.

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The next page gives us the inventory:

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From this, we know that he left property valued at £21, 16 shillings and 6 pence. The items were:

  • A purse and apparel.
  • In the house: five irons; three pewter dishes; one candlestick; a tankard; three bottles; a brass pot; an iron pot; a table; a form; a cupboard.
  • In the parlour: an old bedstead; a rug; curtains; two chests; one little table.
  • In the chamber: one half-headed bedstead with one flock bed and two blankets.
  • One flitch of bacon
  • In the shop: two looms(?) with materials belonging thereunto
  • Linen and lumber
  • Two cows and one heifer; two year-old calves.

This suggests that he may have been a weaver by trade. William was buried on 5 March 1693 at St Alkmund’s Church in Duffield. Even though he lived over three hundred years ago, there is still a story to be told and more to discover.

Ari, this is how you are related to William:

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Joseph Goodall of Bradley

Joseph Goodall was Ari’s 6x great-grandfather, born in 1758 in Bradley, Ashbourne, Derbyshire and christened on 5 October at All Saints’ Church.

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His parents were William Goodall and Mary Pegg, who had married in Ashbourne earlier in 1758.

We know that Joseph was a farmer, from his daughter’s marriage certificate, but there are no other records to confirm this. In about 1801 he married Ann, and their first daughter Hannah was born in 1802, followed by Fanny in 1804, Elizabeth in 1808, Joseph in 1813 and Harriet in 1817.

Joseph died in 1827 and was buried in the churchyard at Bradley.

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Ari, this is how you are related to Joseph:

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