Mary Elizabeth Ellen (Nellie) Wheeldon

Screenshot 2020-08-08 at 12.59.19

Ari’s great-great-grandmother, Nellie Wheeldon, was born on 23 Feb 1911 at 167 Nottingham Road, in Belper, Derbyshire.

Her father, John Edgar Pearson Wheeldon, registered the birth on 3 April. He gave his occupation as blacksmith (journeyman). Nellie’s mother was Elizabeth Anne Murfin.

We have a copy of her birth certificate that was issued for the purposes of unemployment insurance in 1932.

She appeared in the 1911 census at five weeks old:

Screenshot 2020-08-08 at 13.05.40
1911 census, Ancestry.co.uk

Her christening took place in Wirksworth the following month, by which time the family had moved to Alderwasley:

Screenshot 2020-08-08 at 13.12.18
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813–1916, Ancestry.co.uk

Nellie worked as a winder before her marriage. She married Horace Sims on 27 Feb 1932 at St Peter’s in Belper. Her address at the time was 189 Nottingham Rd, Belper.

Screenshot 2020-08-08 at 13.25.21
Derby Evening Telegraph, 15 Nov 1941, Findmypast

Nellie’s signature can be seen on the marriage certificate, as well as that of her mother and her brother (her father had died eight years earlier).

Screenshot 2020-08-08 at 13.28.37

By the time war had broken out, Nellie and Horace had one son, John Norman (Ari’s great-grandfather). They were at 36a Penn St. in Belper.

“Once war became inevitable the British Government knew they had to issue National Identity cards. They planned for the wide-scale mobilisation of the population and the eventual introduction of rationing. The most recent census was now almost a decade old, so more up-to-date statistics were needed. Some preparations had already begun for the 1941 census, so the Government capitalised on this to take a register of the civilian population. They issued Identity cards immediately afterwards (which were used until 1952).” (FindMyPast)

Screenshot 2020-08-08 at 13.42.46
1939 Register, Ancestry.co.uk

This is an undated photo of Nellie and Norman.

nornel

Nellie can be seen in this colorized and enhanced photo from Norman and Audrey’s wedding in 1957:

Screenshot 2020-08-08 at 13.39.48

This one is of Nellie with her two grandsons in 1963:

nelnig

And a couple of years later:

horacenel

horacenellie
With Horace

Nellie died on 16 Jan 1985 at 21 Ecclesbourne Close, Duffield. The cause of death was squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and rheumatoid arthritis.

Ari, this is how you are related to Nellie:

Samuel Syms of Broadholme, yeoman

Samuel Sims was Ari’s 7x great-grandfather.

geograph-5432851-by-Alan-Murray-Rust
View of the Derwent valley from Broadholme Lane

He was born in 1727 in Broadholme, Belper, Derbyshire, and baptised on 24 September that year at St Alkmund’s in Duffield.

Screenshot 2020-07-23 at 12.46.31
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538–1812, Ancestry.co.uk

Samuel’s parents were James Syms and Hannah Barber, and he was their fifth child.

On 11 February 1752 Samuel married Mary Smith at the church in Duffield.

Screenshot 2020-07-23 at 12.55.00
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538–1812, Ancestry.co.uk

(Although it says 1751, this entry comes after the page for December 1751.)

Samuel’s father James died in 1763, and his will mentions Samuel as follows:

Item. I give and bequeath to my beloved son Samuel Simms all my share of land being situate and lying at Hithin(?) Holler. Item I also leave to my said son Samuel Simms the Swinny Croft and the Dunge Pingle; I also leave to my said son Samuel Simms all the whole possession of Broadholm living with all the personal estate thereto belonging.

Item. I leave to my said son Samuel Simms all the whole possession of the Fishyards my son Samuel paying his brother Charles the sum of ten pounds to be paid at the expiration of twelve months after my decease. And I do hereby nominate and appoint my said son Samuel Simms my sole executor of this will and testament.

At some point I will have to investigate old maps of the area to see where these pieces of land are. I have seen references to Dunge Wood and Dunge Farm on Broadholme Lane. A typed bulletin of the Derbyshire Archaeological and Natural History Society from 1957 has this:

“Going back to the Alport Road we come to Sandiford Lane, where another road seems to have gone East down to the Derwent where there was a ford by Dunge Wood. The name Sandiford must have been used for this ford. … This road … is the boundary between Belper and Alderwasley. The road goes by Dunge Wood and the top of Broadholme Lane, across Crich Lane, over the Heage and Belper Common to the Bent. It appears to have led to Morley Park and Rykneld Street and was probably used for both lead and coal for Wirksworth for smelting purposes. The road from the top of Broadholme Lane would be to an alternative crossing at Belper if the other ford was difficult.” (p. 65)

geograph-5827127-by-Malcolm-Neal

Perhaps some kind person reading my blog one day will help out with the place names!

On 17 November 1791, Samuel made a will, as follows:

In the name of God Amen I Samuel Sims of the Liberty of Heage in the county of Derby, Yeoman do make this my last will and testament in the manner following that is to say I give unto my wife Mary all my moneys and securities for money and all my personal estate during her natural life while she keeps in the same name and then I bequeath all my effects after her decease unto my three sons Samuel, James and John equal share and share alike their executors administrators and assigns only paying to my four daughters Hannah Sarah Elizabeth and Ann the sum of twenty pounds to be paid twelve months after my wife decease. I nominate and constitute and appoint my wife Mary and my son James joint executors of my last will and testament in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal’d this seventeenth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety one.

Screenshot 2020-07-23 at 13.06.26
Staffordshire, Dioceses Of Lichfield and Coventry Wills and Probate 1521–1860, Findmypast

His 5x grandson will be pleased to see that he signs his own name as Sims, not Syms.

Samuel died in February 1792 and was buried in Duffield on the 19th of that month. His will was proved on 24 April 1792. The will was very helpful in confirming who his children were.

Screenshot 2020-07-23 at 13.18.54
Broadholme in the news: Derby Mercury, 13 July 1842, Findmypast

Ari, this is how you are related to Samuel:

Screenshot 2020-07-23 at 13.23.08

 

Emily Fanny Williams of Ashbourne

Emily Fanny Williams was Ari’s 4x great-grandmother. Her birth certificate shows that she was born on 9 April 1845 at Low Top in Ashbourne, Derbyshire, daughter of Samuel Williams and Eliza Grace Potter.

Screenshot 2020-07-10 at 13.30.43

Low Top is the steep upward slope from the northern part of Ashbourne marketplace. In the late eighteenth century it formed the turnpike road to Buxton and Bakewell, and is now Buxton Road.

Derbyshire
Series: Boundary Commission Report 1832. Publisher: H.M.S.O. Sheet: Derbyshire. Scale: 1:253440. This work incorporates historical material provided by the Great Britain
Historical GIS Project and the University of Portsmouth through their web
site A Vision of Britain through Time (http://www.VisionofBritain.org.uk). CREATIVE COMMONS ATTRIBUTION 4.0 INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC LICENSE (CC BY 4.0)

Emily’s baptism took place at St Oswald’s on 25 May 1845:

Screenshot 2020-07-10 at 13.53.45
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813–1916, Ancestry.co.uk
geograph-4942128-by-Michael-Garlick
Detail of the chancel and choir roof, St Oswald’s

By the time of the 1851 census, Emily was at school in Ashbourne. The 1861 census gives no details of what she was doing, so we don’t know if she had a job of any kind, but no doubt she would have helped her mother with her five younger siblings. We know that she married John Sims when she was twenty-three, on 22 June 1868. She was described as a spinster, of full age, living at Church St in Derby.

In the 1871 census Emily’s job is to “Keep House”. They are living at Collyhurst Road in Manchester, and Emily has had two children: Louisa Ann (born in Ashbourne) and baby John Samuel, born in Manchester.

Ten years later, they are back in Derbyshire, running the Red Lion in Hognaston. Emily has given birth to four more children: Harriet (1873), Frederick (1875), Horace (1877), and George (1880).

geograph-358224-by-Ken-Walton

Emily had two more children: Gertrude in 1883 and Walter in 1885. The 1891 and 1901 censuses show the family living in Holbrook, and by 1911 they are on Alfreton Road, Little Eaton.

We don’t know what Emily did after her husband died in 1918, but she was still in Little Eaton at the time of her death on 17 March 1927.

Screenshot 2020-07-10 at 14.22.58

Her youngest son, Walter, was present when she died. I have not found a will or a burial for her. Emily outlived two of her children: John Samuel, who died at the age of thirty-five in 1906; and Ari’s 3x great-grandfather Frederick, who died from Spanish flu just three weeks after his father John.

Ari, this is how you are related to Emily:

Screenshot 2020-07-10 at 14.57.02

Henry Dawson, silk glove maker from Duffield

Henry Dawson was one of Ari’s 5x great-grandfathers. He was born on 18 April 1810 in Duffield, Derbyshire, the son of a linen weaver, Francis Dawson, and Martha Dunn. His baptism took place on 12 May 1810 at Duffield’s Presbyterian Chapel.

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 19.19.29
England & Wales, Non-Conformist and Non-Parochial Registers, 1567–1970, Ancestry.co.uk

(Notes from Derbyshire County Council’s online catalogue: “The Presbyterian Chapel in Wirksworth Road, Duffield, was built before 1790. In the early 19th century the congregation adopted the Unitarian faith. By 1860 the chapel had closed, but it was subsequently rented to the trustees of Duffield Reading Room. After the 1870 Education Act, Mrs Constance Smith of Duffield Hall encouraged the establishment of an infant school in the former chapel, which remained in use for this purpose until 1895. In the 20th century it became the meeting place for many local organisations including the local Temperance Society. In the 1960s and 1970s it was a china factory called Abbeydale China Co. Ltd., and in the 1980s was used as a light engineering workshop. Despite local protests, the building was demolished in June 2001 to make way for a housing development.”)

We don’t know anything else about Henry until his marriage at the age of twenty-five. He married Charlotte Parker on 27 December 1835 at St Alkmund’s church in the village.

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 19.25.03
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754–1932, Ancestry.co.uk

The 1841 census shows us Henry, working as a silk framework knitter, his wife Charlotte, two-year-old Elizabeth, and two-month-old Philip. They were living on the Wirksworth Turnpike Road in Duffield.

geograph-4108208-by-Ian-Calderwood
The Derby to Duffield Turnpike was authorised in 1756 and operated until 1875. It is now the A6.

Henry and Martha’s first son, William (aged four), was staying with Henry’s parents.

By 1851, Henry had become a silk glove maker, sons William (14) and Philip (10) were silk winders and three more children had been born: Caroline in 1844, Martha in 1847, and Francis Henry in 1850. They were living at Upper Green, and Henry’s parents were living with them (his father Francis would die that December):

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 19.43.01
1851 census, Ancestry.co.uk

It was not a good time to be in the industry. The local papers were full of depressing news about the state of trade, and the family would all have had to work to earn enough to live on.

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 20.00.48
Derby Mercury, 18 December 1839, Findmypast

There had been a strike in 1845:

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 19.53.07
Derbyshire Courier, 2 August 1845, Findmypast
Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 19.56.42
Derby Mercury, 2 July 1851, Findmypast

The family moved to Castle Orchard before the 1861 census.

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 19.46.38

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 19.48.12
Derby Mercury 02 June 1886, Findmypast

Francis Henry had died aged two, and one more child had been born: Charlotte Agnes in 1853. Henry’s widowed mother was living with them and working as a washerwoman.

Henry died at London Rd Infirmary in Derby when he was only fifty-three, on 31 October 1864. The record of his hospital admission is included in the collection called Derbyshire Hospital Admissions And Deaths 1855–1913 on Findmypast. The cause of death was given as “Disease of bladder, Asthenia” (asthenia is weakness or lack of energy).

He was buried at St Alkmund’s on 3 November:

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 20.09.53
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Burials, 1813–1991, Ancestry.co.uk

Ari, this is how you are related to Henry:

Screenshot 2020-06-19 at 20.21.12

William Morris of Milford

One of Ari’s 4x great-grandfathers was William Morris, born in Milford, Derbyshire, in 1845.

geograph-2085193-by-Peter-Barr

He was the second son of foundry watchman John Morris and cotton spinner Ann Beresford. I have just discovered a third son, Jacob, who was born when William was five and died at eighteen months. Jacob was baptised at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Milford (this was built in 1842 and closed in 1949 – see this page for a photo).

The 1851 census shows that William was aged five, and at school. The family was living at No. 8, Hopping Hill, West Terrace, Milford.

geograph-3381704-by-Dave-Bevis
Milford – view to Hopping Hill and West Terrace
geograph-3318483-by-Dave-Bevis
These houses appear to be 2 storeys on Hopping Hill, but are 4 storeys when viewed from Derby Road below.

These houses were built by the Strutt family for mill workers. A conservation document drawn up in 2007 provides some interesting details. Built between 1813 and 1820, the back-to-back cottages were designed with care on a challengingly steep site, and each had its own yard and garden. The cottages did not have running water until 1897.

In the 1861 census, the Morris family were at No. 5. A photo of the unaltered interior can be seen in this document. William (15), his brother George, and their father John were all listed as cotton spinners.

William married Caroline Dawson on 28 Dec 1868. By this time he was a foundry labourer living at Russell Street, Litchurch, in Derby.

Their first child, John Henry, was born the following year, and the 1871 census shows them living with William’s parents at 69 Russell Street. Another three children were born before the next census: Elizabeth Ann (Lizzie) in 1873, Charlotte Ellen (Nellie) in 1875, and Annie in 1880. William started work as an agent for an insurance company, and the family moved to No. 6 Harrington St. In the 1891 census William was still at the same address.

By 1901, William had become a gas fitter. The family were now at 38 Nelson Road in Normanton, Derby. The 1911 census shows that William was working as a gas fitter for Midlands Railway. The Derby Daily Telegraph of 22 November 1904 highlighted the dangers of the job:

Screenshot 2020-03-22 at 11.35.43
Findmypast.co.uk

William died on 28 Dec 1914 at 100 Dale Road, Derby. He was described as a gas fitter’s labourer, Railway Works, and the cause of death was asthma, bronchitis and cardiac failure. He was sixty-nine. His daughter Annie was present. I have not found out where William was buried, and he did not leave a will.

Ari, this is how you are related to William:

Screenshot 2020-03-22 at 11.46.43

 

 

Walter Ford of Yeaveley and Mayfield, farmer

Ari’s 5x great-grandfather Walter Ford was born in Yeaveley, Derbyshire, on 3 Feb 1817, the son of farmer John Ford and his wife Elizabeth. He was baptised on 23 Feb at St Michael’s in Shirley, the first of the year in that church.

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 09.15.32
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813–1916 on Ancestry.co.uk

geograph-2188189-by-Martyn-Glover

The 1841 census shows Walter living in Yeaveley in the home of Ann Bladon, farmer, working as a male servant:

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 09.28.50
1841 census, Ancestry.co.uk

On 11 Jan 1844 he married Ann’s daughter Sarah Jane Bladon.

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 09.36.00

(As noted in Sarah’s story, she was only sixteen at the time and her mother had to give consent.)

The 1851 census shows the family at Hales Green, Yeaveley, still living with Ann:

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 09.42.55
1851 census, Ancestry.co.uk

By then four children had been born. Sarah Jane died in 1859, and Walter is shown in the 1861 census as a widower:

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 09.48.31
1861 census, Ancestry.co.uk

He was still in Yeaveley, working as an agricultural labourer. Three of his children were living with him (another daughter, Sarah, 6, was visiting relatives on the census night; she later moved to Lincolnshire, married there in 1883, and raised her family in Lincoln).

In 1871 Walter was living with his sister, Elizabeth Greaves, over the border with Staffordshire in Mayfield.

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 10.31.37
1871 census, Ancestry.co.uk

I need to research this, but it looks as though their farm, Manor House, later became Old Hall Farm – see this description as part of a walk. See also https://mayfieldheritage.org.uk/old-hall-farm-middle-mayfield/

Walter was listed as a farm servant, aged 53.

geograph-5316151-by-Chris-Morgan

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 10.50.26
Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal, 27 December 1878, Findmypast.co.uk

Walter died at Mayfield on 9 August 1875, without making a will.

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 10.38.05

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 10.38.58

He was buried at St John the Baptist, Mayfield.

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 10.42.39
Staffordshire Burials, Findmypast.co.uk

geograph-5312270-by-Graham-Hogg

Ari, this is how you are related to Walter:

Screenshot 2020-03-07 at 11.03.42

John Sims, farmer

Ari’s 6x great-grandfather John Sims was born in Heage, Derbyshire, in 1775 and baptised on 17 July at St Alkmund’s Church, Duffield. His parents were Samuel Sims and Mary Smith.

geograph-674946-by-John-Poyser.jpg
Sheep grazing in the snow, below Heage Windmill

On 19 May 1807 John married Sarah Badder at Bradley, near Ashbourne. They had a daughter, Sarah in 1810, and then John’s wife Sarah died in January 1815 just after giving birth to a son, John.

Screenshot 2019-12-20 at 08.44.31.png
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Burials, 1813–1991, on Ancestry.co.uk

Sarah was buried at St Peter’s Church in Belper, and the residence is given as Morley Park.

John married his second wife, Ann Slater, at the church in Duffield two years later.

Screenshot 2019-12-20 at 08.56.16.png
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754–1932, on Ancestry.co.uk

They went on to have at least six more children: Samuel, George, William, Mary Ann, Elizabeth-Jane, and Betty. We know from the baptism record of William in 1826 that John was a farmer at Morley Park.

Screenshot 2019-12-20 at 09.01.52.png
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813–1916, on Ancestry.co.uk

John is listed in an 1829 County Directory as a farmer and freeholder. The 1841 census shows John at Yeldersley:

Screenshot 2019-12-20 at 09.12.56.png
1841 census, Ancestry.co.uk

Also in the household were Ann, sons George and William, and three servants.

The 1851 census tells us that John was at Yeldersley Farm, farming 250 acres.

Screenshot 2019-12-20 at 09.46.55.png
Derbyshire Courier, on Findmypast.co.uk

John died on 3 July 1858 in Yeldersley and was buried at All Saints Church in Bradley.

Screenshot 2019-12-20 at 09.22.50.png

john sims grave Bradley.JPG

John left a two-page will.

John Sims 1858 will.jpg

John Sims will 2.jpg

One of John’s grandchildren was Joseph Sims (son of John born in 1815). After his death, Joseph’s wife Julia Hannah Alldread paid for this beautiful stained-glass window in St Peter’s Church, Belper which we recently discovered thanks to Julia’s will: “to provide a stained glass window in Saint Peter’s Church Belper on the North side thereof at a cost not exceeding the sum of Two hundred pounds”.

Screenshot 2019-12-20 at 09.59.45.png

Ari, this is how you are related to John:

Screenshot 2019-12-20 at 10.08.58

 

David Spencer, limestone quarry delver

One of Ari’s 3x great-grandfathers was David Spencer. David was born on 11 May 1867 in Middleton-by-Wirksworth, Derbyshire, to Judith Brooks and William Spencer.

Screenshot 2019-11-30 at 11.40.37
David’s birth certificate

He was their eighth child. His baptism took place one month later.

Screenshot 2019-11-30 at 11.46.35.png
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813–1916, Ancestry.co.uk

The 1871 census shows David aged three, living at Rise End in Middleton, and at school. There is a school record for Middleton By Wirksworth National School showing his admission at 3 years, 7 months in October 1870.

Screenshot 2019-11-30 at 11.57.14.png
Front cover of the register, National School Admission Registers & Log-books 1870–1914, Findmypast.co.uk

David was still listed as a scholar in 1881 at the age of fourteen, when the family were living in Water Lane, but by 1891 he was working in a quarry, probably a limestone quarry (where his father William worked). His mother, Judith, had died the year before.

On 9 May 1897, David married Elizabeth Pearson at the parish church in Wirksworth. His profession was given as Quarryman.

geograph-5109034-by-Christine-Johnstone.jpg

The 1901 census shows them living at 11 Dale Street in Wirksworth with their two daughters, Mary Ann and Elizabeth. David’s mother-in-law and father-in-law were next door.

Screenshot 2019-11-30 at 12.12.23.png
1901 census, Ancestry.co.uk

In 1911 David was a limestone quarry delver, living at Coldwell Street in Wirksworth.

Screenshot 2019-11-30 at 12.39.08.png
1911 census, Ancestry.co.uk

(Sadly, baby Emma, their last child, had died in 1908.)

I have this photo of the family (Elizabeth and David on the left, then Harry, with Mary at the back and David on the right).

Screenshot 2019-11-30 at 12.27.59.png

David died on 19 January 1938 at 26 Queen Street, Belper. By this time he was working as a hoist man (lift operator) at the English Sewing Cotton Company. His son David was present at the death.

I have to share this story featuring Queen Street in 1930!

Screenshot 2019-11-30 at 12.50.35.png
Derby Daily Telegraph, 15 February 1930, Findmypast.co.uk

 

The house is still there, in the middle of this picture:

IMG_20191215_150259.jpg

Ari, this is how you are related to David:

Screenshot 2019-11-30 at 13.09.26

Ann Sheldon of Whatstandwell, blacksmith

Ann Sheldon was one of Ari’s 5x great-grandmothers. She was born in 1823, in Biggin-By-Wirksworth in Derbyshire.

In the 1851 census, Ann was twenty-seven, living with her widowed father John at Pointon Cross, Hucklow, where he was a farmer. Shortly after that, on the 8th of June, she married John Frost Bunting, a blacksmith.

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 07.09.34.png

John had previously been married to Ann’s aunt, Mary Ann Sheldon, who had died in May 1849, leaving him with a nine-year-old son, Jacob. (This marriage caused an interesting tangle in Ari’s tree!):

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 07.30.07

I don’t know who Ann’s mother was. I haven’t been able to find her baptism record or the marriage of her father, and I haven’t found them in 1841 yet.

By 1861 they were living at Crich Carr, with Jacob and six children of their own. In 1871, they were at Whatstandwell, next to the Bull’s Head. Ann was described in the census as a housewife, and there were five children at home, from nineteen-year-old Mary down to six-year-old Charles.

By the 1881 census, Ann’s husband John had died, so she was now the head of the household.

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 07.48.59.png

The youngest child, Frederic, was Ann’s grandson, the illegitimate son of Ari’s 4x great-grandmother, Mary Ann. Frederic was also a blacksmith, and in 1905 he emigrated to a place called Elyria in Ohio with his wife Sarah Jane and children Vernon and Dorothy. (His baptism, marriage and death records all give no father’s name, but when he applied for social security, the U.S. Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 gives his father’s name as Samuel Wheeldon, who Mary married in 1875.)

Frederic had taken advantage of an offer whereby the Canadian government’s immigration branch paid commission to steamship booking agents in the UK for any suitable immigrants who bought tickets (the immigrants didn’t receive the bonus themselves unless they settled on western homesteads).

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 09.01.15.png
Passenger record for Frederic and family on the Lake Manitoba, arriving in St John, New Brunswick, Canada, from Liverpool. Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865–1935, Ancestry.co.uk

Maybe he decided that farming wasn’t for him – by 1910 he was back to being a blacksmith, in Ohio. Frederic died in Elyria at the age of seventy-five.

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 08.45.15.png

His obituary appeared in the Chronicle-Telegram in Elyria:

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 08.44.19.png
Obituary of Frederic William Bunting, 2 Aug 1946, from Newspapers.com

Ann was sixty-eight in 1891, running a blacksmith’s business in Whatstandwell.

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 09.09.32.png

Her daughters Louisa and Lizzie were living with her and working as dressmakers. Son Charles and grandson Frederic (described here as her son) were blacksmiths.

Here she is in Kelly’s Directory for 1891:

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 09.15.05

Ann died a couple of months later, on the 6th of June. The cause of death was bronchitis and cardiac failure, and her son Charles was present at the death. She was buried at Crich.

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 09.17.10.png

IMG_20181220_141437.jpg

Ann’s death was reported in the Derby Telegraph and the Ripley and Heanor News:

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 09.22.41.png

I have ordered a copy of the will of Ann and her father John, so will update this post when they arrive.

Ari, this is how you are related to Ann:

Screen Shot 2019-11-09 at 09.58.30.png

 

Samuel Boothby, cotton framework knitter

Samuel Boothby was Ari’s 6x great-grandfather, born in Duffield, Derbyshire, in 1781. He was the fourth child and first son of Samuel Boothby and Anne Radford, and was baptised at St Alkmund’s in Duffield on 20 March 1781.

Screen Shot 2019-09-22 at 07.18.17
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538–1812, Ancestry.co.uk

(Unusually, the mother gets a mention!)

geograph-1829059-by-Eamon-Curry.jpg
Makeney Road bridge from a public footpath between it and St Alkmund’s Church, Duffield, Derbyshire.

The next record for Samuel is at the time of his marriage to Elizabeth Saunders, on 1 Apr 1804.

Screen Shot 2019-09-22 at 07.26.00.png
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754–1932, Ancestry.co.uk

The marriage also took place at St Alkmund’s.

geograph-5846114-by-The-Carlisle-Kid.jpg

Elizabeth and Samuel had at least six children, and we can trace Samuel through the baptisms and marriages of the children. For example, when their second son Samuel was baptised on 17 June 1822, their abode is given as Holbrook Makeney, and Samuel’s profession was Framework Knitter:

Screen Shot 2019-09-22 at 08.31.38
Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813–1916, Ancestry.co.uk

When their oldest son William married in 1840, he gave his father’s details as “Samuel Boothby, framework knitter”. Daughter Elizabeth did the same in 1851, when she married shoemaker John Gillott. But when their son Samuel married in 1846, he said his father was a labourer. When Elizabeth died in 1870, her death certificate described her as:

Screen Shot 2019-09-22 at 09.48.22

AN01044756_001_m
Front view of a knitting machine. 1751 etching, Thomas Paul Sandby. Sandby’s father was a framework knitter and it is likely that this was taken from one of his father’s machines.

None of the marriages listed Samuel as deceased, but he was not listed in the 1841 census. The most likely death date for him is August 1822. There is a burial at Duffield for Samuel Boothby, aged 41, from Makeney. The only problem with this death date is that Elizabeth has a daughter Emily, born in 1829, living with her in 1841. I haven’t found a baptism record, so possibly she had a different father.

We will need to go to the church again and look for his grave. Samuel did not leave a will.

geograph-1219329-by-Dave-Bevis
The Holly Bush Inn at Makeney

Ari, this is how you are related to Samuel:

Screen Shot 2019-09-22 at 09.38.39